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Life is about Decisions

Life is about Decisions

Over the Thanksgiving break, I listened to a book on CD on my drive to Kansas. I was enjoying the suspense and action of the novel called The Cuban Affair by Nelson DeMille. The protagonist had been in the army, but was now a private charter boat captain in Key West. As the action heats up, he reminds himself that most people believe that life is made up of our choices. But, as a military man, he says he knows that life is a made up by our decisions.

I thought about the distinction between the words “choices” and “decisions.” I like the energy behind the word decisions. It feels much more empowering and more conscious than the word choices. Decision lends itself to the energy that there will be ramifications or even repercussions to the action taken. Or ramifications and repercussions to not taking the action. Recognizing the consequences will make us more conscious about the action we will take.

Even looking at the dictionary definitions, choice seems to be a selection between two or more alternatives. Whereas, decision is a conclusion or resolution reached after consideration. Again, decisions feels much more active.

In our quest to be more alive and more conscious, we might want to focus on integrating the energy of decisions. We can decide what we are moving toward.  We can decide what we want to leave behind. We can decide to leave behind the victimization energy that might have held us to old beliefs and old habits. Focus on making decisions that will move us forward into our evolution and to help us remember the Light which we are.

Will the decisions we make today help our evolution? I hope so!

Thanks to Pixabay.com for the picture!

 

Divine Resilience: Willingness to Remember Who I Truly Am

Divine Resilience: Willingness to Remember Who I Truly Am

Today’s blog entry is an excerpt from the upcoming Teaching and Potluck on November 10 called Divine Resilience: The Willingness to Remember Who I Truly Am

Earlier in the year, we worked with the energy of Transfiguration. We were working with the energy to transform our world by increasing our ability to hold the energy of transfiguration. One of the key components to being willing to transfigure into the true essence of who we are is to hold and integrate the energy of resilience. Today, we will focus on this energy and the subcomponents of resilience. As we often start our teachings, here is the definition of resilience from dictionary.com. 

  1. the power or ability to return to the original form, position, etc., after being bent, compressed, or stretched; elasticity.
  2. ability to recover readily from illness, depression, adversity, or the like; buoyancy.

 I love this definition. It seems perfect for working with the idea to climb out of the experiment zone.

When Ginger and I first started working on this topic, Ginger reminded me of the image Kris Duffy use to describe. The image of taking a rubber band and stretching it out to show our perceptions in the illusion and then letting it go (gently!) to show how quickly we snap back into our original selves when we truly and completely let go.  It was a great reminder of how fluid we are inherently when we allow it and that it actually takes more energy to hold ourselves stretched out of shape then it does to allow ourselves back to our original one.  It was also a great reminder that we have inherent memory of our natural state, that it isn’t lost and has to be regained. It is still held in our energetic field and we actually desire to return to that state, to what we remember on a deeper level, despite what it feels like on the surface.

Thus, the idea that we are “returning to the original form” is just our perception; it is just the illusion. We have always been our original form of Source, our original Divinity. It is only our experiences within the illusion of the experiment which makes us believe that we have been something “other than divine, other than source”. It is through allowing our belief system and our energy to focus on being resilient that we will more easily remember who we truly are.

Having a sense of resilience is all about looking at everything as an optimist. I am not suggesting that we have a naïve view of where we have been and what we have done. I am suggesting that we don’t judge it and instead allow for the possibility that it doesn’t need to inform or define how we move into the future. Looking at the world as a pessimist may make you “right” but does it help you evolve? Does it help you to heal? Is being “right” about “everything” the goal? Is that what you want to be known for?

Do I want to be known as predicting the stock market crash, the rise of neo XXXX (fill in the blank) group, global warming and divisions between humans? Or do I want to be part of the solution with the attitude of helping to find common ground with the neo XXXX (fill in the blank) group, finding solutions to global warming and division between humans? 

If you are guided to attend a rally to seek change in the outer world, do it from the perspective of helping to increase solidarity v. increasing divisions. Do it in order to help increase standing in our divine power v. polarizing power between the left and the right, between the haves and the have nots. Divine Resilience will help you to be part of the ONE SOLUTION…and the One Solution has many parts and many layers. Just like the United States Motto: E Pluribus Unum. Out of the many, One. Out of many answers and resolutions comes the ultimate solution. Funny story – I just mistyped this last word. I typed SOULUTION instead of Solution. Maybe that wasn’t a mistake at all. Maybe we can look at answers to our issues as SOUL-UTIONS instead of blaming others or just looking for temporary solutions. Look for the SOULUTIONS/ Look for the ONE SOLUTION, the permanent wisdom of knowing ourselves as Source.  

This is the overarching goal. To be part of the solution to help everyone to remember who we truly are. Help everyone to remember We Are Source.  

Is it Safe to Help?

Is it Safe to Help?

While working to master my own fears of scuba diving, I was guided to take the PADI Rescue Diver course. In this course we learn techniques and procedures to help if another diver is panicked, has run out of air or has had a physical injury including loss of consciousness. Later in November, I will be taking a re-certification class for the Wilderness First Responder training I have also had.

It dawned on me that the first step in both of these emergency response procedures is to determine if the situation is safe to help the other person. If you don’t have the strength, the qualifications or the training to help, it is best if you don’t offer aid. The logic is that you don’t want to turn a situation with one victim into a situation with two victims. I suppose this goes along with the airline procedures of always put your own mask on first before helping someone else with their mask.

I will tell you that I had to do my own meditating and clearing on this idea of not helping. I wonder why people struggle with this idea of restraint. Is it that none of us wants to feel powerless to help? Is it that we have watched too many action hero movies that we think we can pull off something that we are either not qualified for nor for which the outcome is going to be what the outcome is with or without our assistance – the impotent inevitability? Have we allowed ourselves to become too attached to a certain or even perfect outcome of all experiences? Could there also be a co-dependent relationship with the victim? I suppose it may be a combination of all of these and other factors too.

However, what if we aren’t talking about a life and death situations, but instead are talking about whether it is “safe” to help others in more everyday situations. We could substitute the words “highest plan” for “safe” to see if everyday situations should be acted upon. Are we allowing co-dependency to cloud our judgment whether to loan money to a family member? Are we checking with guidance regarding whether to stop alongside the road to give assistance? Are we willing to stand in our power to say “no” to a loved one when it isn’t in the highest plan to help because helping would be rescuing them instead of helping them to evolve?

Helping others when it is the highest plan is noble even part of our divine service. Helping others when it feeds their victimization is not in the highest plan. We need to follow our inner wisdom, our guidance to determine when to help and when we should refrain from helping. This is a balancing act that we can all master by following our guidance for what is in the highest good of all.

Thanks to Pixabay.com for the beautiful image.

 

 

Snow Fall

Snow Fall

Author’s note: I have been cleaning my office on this August day. I found this channeling and although a little early in the year for snow fall, even for the front range of Colorado, I thought the ideas this blog entry raises are welcome no matter the season. Transport yourself to winter…

As I watch the snow fall during rush hour in the city, I am reminded how the snowflakes are like wisdom. Most of the time, we are not the warm ground ready to integrate and embrace the snowflakes of wisdom into our lives. Instead, we are the harsh ground hoping to eliminate the unwelcome advice of the universe before we have a chance to enjoy the beauty. We don’t want to alter our habits and our plans for the evening. In fact, this life giving precipitation is seen as inconvenient at a minimum; do we have plenty of bottled water, milk and toilet paper (and wine, if you are at my house!) in case the electricity goes off? I am never quite sure how the toilet paper is supposed to help if the electricity goes out, but if conventional wisdom says to buy it, we do. And at the extreme, at least on the days we need to commute, the snow is threatening, a burden and potentially has the power to harm. At least that is how the headlines would read; “five killed in freak snow storm.”

Aren’t new ideas – aka wisdom – seen as inconvenient? I am going to have to learn something new? Didn’t I learn everything I was supposed to in Kindergarten, anyway?” We allow ourselves, grudgingly in some cases to learn new technologies, new techniques, but do we really open ourselves up to new ideas and concepts? “If my mother didn’t tell me about it, well then, it probably doesn’t need to be learned.” OK – I learned a lot, both practically and spiritually from my mother, but I am willing to admit, as would she, that there are plenty of other teachers out there who might have another piece to help me complete my puzzle.

If we don’t embrace the wisdom when it is falling slowly, lovely and silently from the heavens – if we don’t get it when the wisdom is gentle, then we may only surrender to the wisdom when it is piled high and terrifying. Just like the snow during the afternoon commute, the wisdom will eventually take hold. The only question is whether we will embrace it and be an early adopter; enjoying the benefits of the secrets the universe has for us and for all? Or will we be late comers to the new information? It doesn’t matter which we are. There is no judgment from the wisdom. It is simply a matter of how joyful is our commute home.

Being prepared for the snow may be as easy as being open to the gentle wisdoms; integrating the snowflakes as they fall into our conscious awareness, shovel as we go along and have the cork screw ever at the ready. Then, do as the high school students do: pray for a snow day.

Thanks to Pixabay.com for photo! 

Balancing Intelligence and Love

Balancing Intelligence and Love

“The brain gives the heart its sight. The heart gives the brain its vision.” These are the words of Rob Kall, a biofeedback engineer. I like Kall’s idea that we need both the functions of intelligence and logic of the brain balanced with the compassion and love of the heart.

One of the Standing in the Light® classes focuses on energetically balancing the brain and the heart. The premise is that we need both of these aspects to be healed and working at full capacity in order to evolve into our ultimate mastery, in order to ascend.

The last time I taught this class, we talked about the myth that humans only use 10% of our brains and all the sci-fi movies were someone is exposed to a chemical, drug or other phenomenon where their brain is able to activate and utilize 100% of its capacity. Specifically, we discussed the 2014 movie, Lucy, with Scarlett Johannsson and Morgan Freeman, where the title character ingests a drug that increases her brain capacity and allows her to activate powers such as telepathy, telekinesis and mental time travel. Lucy’s power is unstoppable. The problem with the extra brain function is that it seems to have eliminated Lucy’s compassion and empathy for others.

This leads us to ponder that perhaps as important as understanding how wonderful the human brain is and its capacity to have more insights, gifts and powers then many of us use on a daily basis, we should also encourage balancing that with the compassion and love of the heart. This is what I believe Kall is suggesting, allowing the brain to give the heart sight and perhaps even common sense but allowing the heart to determine the direction for the actions to be taken.

Often, humans marvel at our intelligence and brain capacity over other animals while at the same time degrading and diminishing the feelings and dignity of others. To paraphrase the Mark 8:36 quote from the Bible, for what shall it profit a man if he has ultimate power and knowledge but doesn’t have compassion, love and kindness? Does the power and the knowledge make us computers as opposed to humans? Does acting as computers make us tools instead of enlightened beings?

The goal is to access ultimate wisdom and power while balancing it with vital empathy and love. The intelligence will allow us to see what needs to be done and the capacity for empathy and love will give us the desire to do it.

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