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Is it Safe to Help?

Is it Safe to Help?

While working to master my own fears of scuba diving, I was guided to take the PADI Rescue Diver course. In this course we learn techniques and procedures to help if another diver is panicked, has run out of air or has had a physical injury including loss of consciousness. Later in November, I will be taking a re-certification class for the Wilderness First Responder training I have also had.

It dawned on me that the first step in both of these emergency response procedures is to determine if the situation is safe to help the other person. If you don’t have the strength, the qualifications or the training to help, it is best if you don’t offer aid. The logic is that you don’t want to turn a situation with one victim into a situation with two victims. I suppose this goes along with the airline procedures of always put your own mask on first before helping someone else with their mask.

I will tell you that I had to do my own meditating and clearing on this idea of not helping. I wonder why people struggle with this idea of restraint. Is it that none of us wants to feel powerless to help? Is it that we have watched too many action hero movies that we think we can pull off something that we are either not qualified for nor for which the outcome is going to be what the outcome is with or without our assistance – the impotent inevitability? Have we allowed ourselves to become too attached to a certain or even perfect outcome of all experiences? Could there also be a co-dependent relationship with the victim? I suppose it may be a combination of all of these and other factors too.

However, what if we aren’t talking about a life and death situations, but instead are talking about whether it is “safe” to help others in more everyday situations. We could substitute the words “highest plan” for “safe” to see if everyday situations should be acted upon. Are we allowing co-dependency to cloud our judgment whether to loan money to a family member? Are we checking with guidance regarding whether to stop alongside the road to give assistance? Are we willing to stand in our power to say “no” to a loved one when it isn’t in the highest plan to help because helping would be rescuing them instead of helping them to evolve?

Helping others when it is the highest plan is noble even part of our divine service. Helping others when it feeds their victimization is not in the highest plan. We need to follow our inner wisdom, our guidance to determine when to help and when we should refrain from helping. This is a balancing act that we can all master by following our guidance for what is in the highest good of all.

Thanks to Pixabay.com for the beautiful image.

 

 

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