Standing in the Light Home

Sweet Surrender

Sweet Surrender

Do you find it hard to surrender? Perhaps you are holding onto the “right” side of an argument or the “better” way of doing something. In many ancient spiritual teachings, surrender is an important practice for spiritual mastery. But in our everyday life, we tend to use surrender in defeatist terms. A sports team surrenders and loses the match. A nation surrenders when it is losing the war. Surrender has become giving up and giving in to one’s own detriment.

The divine perspective of surrender is much different. In divine surrender, we are free from all of the limiting beliefs and dense frequencies which hold us back from being the truth of who we are. In divine surrender, we are actually stepping into the wide river of Oneness and being buoyed by that knowingness of who we are. Surrender is not giving up anything, but becoming everything.

The path to this realization may not always be easy. I remember many years ago when I was in a car accident that fractured my pelvic bone and left me unable to do simple tasks to care for myself. At the time, I felt as if my whole being had been shattered. I felt broken. But the gift in the experience is that many of my old ideas about myself and old ways of approaching life were swept away. I could have held on tightly and tried to return to my old patterns out of a desire for familiarity to comfort me. But after letting go of my self-judgment and fear, I was able to give in to the experience and allow it to carry me to a greater strength and new understanding of myself.

I leave you with this excerpt from Richard Bach’s book Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah:

Once there lived a village of creatures along the bottom of a great crystal river. The current of the river swept silently over them all- young and old, rich and poor, good and evil, the current going its own way, knowing only its own crystal self. Each creature in its own manner clung tightly to the twigs and rocks of the river bottom, for clinging was their way of life, and resisting the current what each had learned from birth.

But one creature said at last, “I am tired of clinging. Though I cannot see it with my eyes, I trust that the current knows where it is going. I shall let go, and let it take me where it will. Clinging, I shall die of boredom.” The other creatures laughed and said, “Fool! Let go and that current you worship will throw you tumbled and smashed across the rocks, and you will die quicker than boredom!”

But the one heeded them not, and taking a breath did let go, and at once was tumbled and smashed by the current across the rocks. Yet, in time, as the creature refused to cling again, the current lifted him free from the bottom, and he was bruised and hurt no more.

And the creatures downstream, to whom he was a stranger, cried, “See a miracle! A creature like ourselves, yet he flies! See the Messiah, come to save us all!” And the one carried in the current said, “I am no more Messiah than you. The river delights to lift us free, if only we dare let go. Our true work is this voyage, this adventure.”

May you find your flow in the stream of surrender!

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest